Can Cheaters Defend Marriage?

I recently read a tremendous account of a man who took his son, a big fan of the honorable Mahatma Gandhi, to perhaps receive some advice on how to get his son to quit his addiction to sweets. Gandhi asked the man to come back with his son two weeks later. The man said that it would be cost prohibitive and wondered why Gandhi could not help him at that time. Gandhi explained that he would just have to come back two weeks later.

Despite the family’s difficult financial situation, the father managed to bring the son back. The father came back with the same question and Gandhi said that the son should quit eating sweets because they were bad for him. The son agreed to immediately stop with sweets. The father was enraged and asked how it was necessary for them to come all the way back just to have him say a simple sentence like that. Gandhi replied that two weeks earlier, he had a similar problem with sweets and could not in good conscious give advice on how to overcome such a problem when he had not himself overcome the problem.

Let us take this mind when taking into consideration the no-longer-Federally-defended-in-court Defense of Marriage Act. The Act was signed by President Bill Clinton with support from Newt Gingrich, Bob Dole, and Bob Barr. What was the purpose of this important act that continues to be argued across the continent? Specifically, it was created to define marriage as being between a man and a woman. I find it curious, in reading the summary of the Act, that it nowhere mentions the importance of staying faithful to ones spouse and not cheating on them.

Perhaps this is why of the four men mentioned above, all of them were unfaithful to their wives — some of them unfaithful on more than one occasion. Bill Clinton, our former president, was nearly removed from office as a result of his infidelity. Bob Barr had to resort to lawyer techniques to avoid saying under oath he had cheated on his wife — was his being married three different times a good example of a model to which we should aspire in holy matrimony? Bob Dole left his first wife for a flight attendant — certainly not inspiring in defense of marriage, is it? Even the high and mighty speaker Newt Gingrich was not free of this problem, having sat by his dying wife’s bed as she recovered from cancer surgery and discussing their separation.

If you are going to argue how a marriage should be defined, shouldn’t you be at least somewhat good at staying in one yourself?

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