Why Do You Wear Pajamas in Public?

In the USA, I’ve seen people wear sweatpants in public, and hospital scrubs worn as street clothes have been de rigueur for a decade now, but I don’t understand the continued rise of wearing pajamas — and slippers! — in public as your actual clothing.

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Wearing Vomit Pants

In a previous discussion here about Coughing in the Crook we discussed the use of special “Vomit Pants” that are worn when one takes public transportation.
Some train and bus seats are created completely of plastic so it is a simpler task to avoid a puddle of urine or that bit of dried vomitus waiting to stain your slacks.

The newer busses and trains, however, cleverly use an industrial strength fabric that conceals most disgusting human remnants and provides no visual forewarning before you sit and, therefore, Vomit Pants become the required uniform of the day to avoid messing your good clothes in the muddle of others.

Do you have a special pair of Vomit Pants you wear on the train, bus or airplane to preserve your real outfit for the day? Or do you just risk sitting in someone else’s spew and piddle and let your pants be damned?

I’m Wearing Invisible Pants!

Journal Square is a major transportation hub in Jersey City for bus connections and PATH train transfers. Much in the same way New York city’s “Times Square” was named after The New York Times newspaper, “Journal Square” is named after The Jersey Journal newspaper.

The Journal Square area is ripe with cultural monuments and ethnic identifications. India Square is one of my favorite places to visit and eat and drink! I also do my banking in the massive Journal Square complex.

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Barefoot in New York

People and their relationship with their shoes, is an important personality identifier as well as a cultural values totem. Janna, an Iowa farm girl, loves her bare feet. She wanders the apartment and neighborhood in bare feet as often as she can and as weather and circumstance permit.

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