Sophocles and the Theatre of War Catharsis

Now that Bin Laden is dead, we can turn the rapt attention of one eye to our future and how we choose to cope with death, loss and drama in a theatre of war.  Young men and women are asked to wear the uniform of the United States of America and kill and punish people for pay under our flag.  How does that experience affect them?  How does knowingly killing strangers influence behavior, thoughts, a sense of self-security and humble future wishes?

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The Collective Nothing: Postmodernism in the Modern Era

The Postmodernist Art movement honors the — Collective Nothing — because the genre doesn’t want to be tied to anything specific, verifiable, or humanly truthful.  The most famous Postmodernist art example in our lifetime is the disgusting “glass pyramid” addition to the Louvre Museum in Paris.

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Anarchy and Agit-Prop Theatre Always Fails

One would think that anarchy in a live theatre setting would be the perfect place to start a political movement or to make sea changes against the current societal norm but history proves few audiences are moved into immediate action based on a live interaction with stage performers.

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Reading the Audience

If you’ve ever appeared before a live audience — or if you’ve created something that was presented to a live audience for you — you are well aware of the symbiotic power between performer and audience and you have learned to immediately recognize the subtle clues an audience provides to tell you if they’re with you or not.  Getting them with you is hard; keeping them with you is harder.

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