iCrime: The Internet Reminds Employers of Your Criminal Past

Job searching was once considerably more simple. People submitted resumes, former employers were called and it was determined if each potential employee was qualified for the job based on their history and whether or not that history was relevant to the job. Naturally, when the employers called the phone numbers they had no way of knowing if they were really reaching former employers or just people pretending to be them. I am reminded of the television show Seinfeld, wherein one character got a friend to pretend to be a company that employed him.

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Concealing the Prison Tat

If you have a tattoo placed on your own skin by your own free will — and if you are going to court — should the State be required to pay a cosmetologist to cover your ink so you’ll get a fair trial?  Can a tattoo ever be unfairly prejudicial?

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Criminals Wear a Mask for a Reason

What’s in a fake name?  Do you ever occlude your identity online and have you ever generated a random identity to fool the cyberworld?  If yes, why?  If not, why not?

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Your ID Card, Your Criminal Record

You are driving to the mall with your children and you find yourself going just a touch over the speed limit. It’s okay, you think to yourself, because you’re going with the flow of traffic. Out of the corner of your eye, you see a police squad car in your rear view mirror. No worries – they have every right to be on the road and there’s no reason to think you’re being followed. Only when you see the car start to flash its lights does the worry commence.

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One in 99: Number One as the Prison Nation

The United States is now the number one nation of the incarcerated in the world. The Pew Center on the States released a new report that one in 99 Americans is a prisoner in the nation’s overcrowded jail and prison system.

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Eyes on the Street in the Early Lives of Cities

In the early lives of cities, having “eyes on the street” was the prime way neighborhood crime was policed and thwarted. The classic, semiotic, image of that early neighborhood watch was the old woman leaning out the window, delicately balancing her elbows in a feather pillow on the windowsill as she watched the activity on the street below.

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