Superman, Batman and Spider-Man: How Murdering Loss Creates Comic Book Character

Over the holiday break, I decided to watch the newest Superman movie and I was certainly disappointed in the silly story, the rebooting of the franchise, and the awful acting of the lead character.  Superman should be wily, and funny, and tough.  He never preens.

It’s always boring when movie production houses feel they have to re-start a story that’s been never-endingly told for generations.  We pretty much know the backstory of Superman and we don’t need to re-live, over and over again, every 10 years or so, just how the star child becomes the Superman on earth.

In my short life, I think I’ve lived through at least a dozen iterations of Superman in film and on television and I would be perfectly fine to have a new Superman just appear in media res.  We get it he’s special and Superhuman, so just drop him in and let the story start with no explanation necessary!

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How Alcoholism Saved Eric Clapton from Suicide

I’m always torn when it comes to admiring people who may be talented, but who should not be morally allowed to reserve our undying adulation.  Fame and adoration tend to clasp each other, and since most performers are broken, it becomes a difficult task to try to divine who deserves our public scorn versus who deserves our moral compassion.

It’s no secret that I’m an Eric Clapton fanatic — but there is no hiding from the facts of his life that he was an addict, an abandoned child and an abandoning father — and one of the greatest guitar talents of several generations.

What’s a fan to do?  Pity the man?  Admire the Guitar God?  Can we temper the person with a little bit of each, or are we not allowed to split the righteous baby when it comes to placing a talent in the history of time?

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An Indian Girl Finds a Hero in Tintin

I grew up in India reading Tintin. If you are a die hard fan of Tintin like me, you probably started scratching your head — when on earth “Tintin” was in India? He wasn’t. The closest Tintin came to India was Tibet but I was still able to find him! Continue reading → An Indian Girl Finds a Hero in Tintin

Rock Band and Guitar Hero Incompatibility

When I wandered into Toys ‘R’ Us on Monday evening this week I had no idea what kind of controversy I would eventually find. I thought it was just going to be a normal leisure stroll through the giant toy store. Of course, I was sorely mistaken and it ended up being a lot more upsetting than it should have been.

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The Expected Incorruptible and the Silver Star

I overheard a conversation on the street the other day.  One woman said to another woman, “She’s so lucky.  Married 40 years and he never cheated on her.”  The other woman sighed as if she’d been passionately kissed.  I wondered why never cheating was something to celebrate instead of something to expect.  When we begin to admire expected, ordinary, behavior and label it “extraordinary” by inference or by honor — we’re on the short path to the dissolution of civilization where every act and deed is heroic and deserving.  The “expected incorruptible” reminded of the story of Monica Brown I recently watched on 60 Minutes.  Pvt. Brown was the second woman in USA history to be awarded the Silver Star. 

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The Overused Hero

It is Memorial Day in America. Today we mourn and celebrate the lives lost in war while in service to our country. The word “Hero” has become overused in our colloquial culture. Teachers who help poor children learn are not heroes. Fathers are not heroes to daughters. A person pulled from a burning building was not saved by a hero. A Hero has a specific meaning and — I argue today of all days — a true Hero is a soldier who donates a bit of their body fighting on foreign soil. Some leave a leg. Some leave an arm. Others leave their hearts.

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The Definition of a Hero

by Andrea Puckett

Tonight, I learned the definition of what a hero is. Since I was a child I have always known the technical definition of a hero as being a person noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose, especially one who has risked or sacrificed his or her life; however, I have heard the term used so freely by the government in the times of war as either a propaganda technique or as a way to consul grieving family members that somehow it lost its meaning.

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