Drama of the Textual Aesthetic and the New York Times

If you haven’t visited the New York Times Opinion Pages online lately, you’re missing one of the truly dramatic textual aesthetic events in a generation.  As you can see in this screenshot below of a Frank Rich article published on Saturday — the fonts, and the complete look of the Opinion Page are crisp, precise and beautiful and look just like the printed page you buy on the street or pick up from your front doorstep — and that magnificent spectacle didn’t happen on accident.

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The Typekit Fonts Tutorial for WordPress.com

UPDATED:  December 9, 2010
After six months of usage, I cancelled our yearly paid TypeKit account this morning and removed all the fonts from all 13 blogs in the Boles Blogs Network.  I did this for two reasons.  The first is because there is a niggly font rendering problem for iOS 4.2 devices like iPhone and iPad with some fonts that requires you to change how you publish a headline or your name, and you need to add Custom CSS to try to make the workaround work.  I have no interest in sleuthing font solutions across 13 blogs for a service we pay to use.  TypeKit should not have offered inferior font sets to customers that causes this sort of hassle.  The second reason for TypeKit removal is that some of the font sets we were using were adding 100kb to over 225kb to page load times.  That’s just too much cruft to load for too little aesthetic gain, and adding that to the iOS font problems we’ve been haggling over the last couple of days placed the final straw on our back that irretrievably broke our interest in supporting TypeKit on our blogs network.

UPDATED:  July 4, 2010
I spent the afternoon trying to figure out how to code Typekit Fonts into all 14 of my WordPress.com blogs to add some spectacle to the drama of this United Stage blog.  The process isn’t simple or intuitive and since there really isn’t any  step-by-step documentation that I could find to help me, I decided to help myself — and you — by constructing this Typekit walk through for the new default Twenty Ten theme.  You start by going to Typekit.com and signing up for an account.  This afternoon, I purchased the Portfolio option for $50.00USD a year because I have 14 blogs in need of fonting.  If you have one blog, you should be able to get away using the free Trial plan — but you will have to wear a Typekit badge.  You do not have to purchase the CSS upgrade on WordPress.com to get Typekit to work on your blog.

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