BUY NOW: Best of David Boles, Blogs: Vol. 6 (2015)

If it’s December, it’s time to ask for your help again in supporting this blog by purchasing our newest conflation — Best of David Boles, Blogs: Volume 6 (2015) — to help cover our yearly bandwidth and server costs! You may read some of the best writing over the past year in this book from David Boles, Janna Sweenie and a newly unearthed gem from the forever magnificent Howard Stein!

BUY NOW!

Continue reading → BUY NOW: Best of David Boles, Blogs: Vol. 6 (2015)

Staring Down the SOPA Threat from the Public Square

SOPA is one of those sudsy scandals that don’t easily wipe off in the public wash.  Once you claim you’re all-in on SOPA, it’s difficult to recant and back out and say you didn’t mean it, and GoDaddy is learning that sticky lesson in heated spades:

GoDaddy was one of the few tech firms to back SOPA but it took its name off the public list of supporters following pressure by big web names and many angry customers.

Wikipedia said it would move its domains away from GoDaddy, as did the Cheezburger Network, owner of Lolcats, and image hosting firm Imgur.

In a statement explaining its change of heart, GoDaddy boss Warren Adelman said: “Fighting online piracy is of the utmost importance, which is why GoDaddy has been working to help craft revisions to this legislation – but we can clearly do better.”

In an interview with tech news site Gizmodo, Mr Adelman took a neutral stance on SOPA but said the company might support it if there were a consensus among net firms on its wording.

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The Deepwater Word vs. The Microblogging Shallows

Technorati recently gave their take on the state of blogging with lots of numbers and percentages — and I would really love to know who these people are who are responding to their questions.  Does Technorati know the identities of their responders, or are these people only blindly self-reporting?  I never flatly trust any number reported in a poll or a pie chart.  I always subtract half the time people say they actually spend on “doing something” — including blogging! — and I always subtract at least 66% from any salary number people claim to earn.

Continue reading → The Deepwater Word vs. The Microblogging Shallows