Tag: writing

David Boles University

Performing Arts and Broadcast Entertainment Professors Should Not Compete with their Students

One of the first things my friend, and mentor — and Columbia University in the City of New York professor — Howard Stein told me, was that he was once a produced, and award-winning Playwright, and when he decided to teach other Playwrights at the University of Iowa for a living, he gave up his Playwright life because he didn’t want to compete with his students. I thought that instinct was honorable and right and the lesson sticks with me today. New plays have a hard enough time getting produced on their own, and when you’re in direct competition with your professor for stage time, and production dollars, you quickly discern how easy it is for the amateur Playwright to fail in the same professional arena as the Professor.

Read More

Boles Blogs

BUY NOW: Best of David Boles, Blogs: Vol. 6 (2015)

If it’s December, it’s time to ask for your help again in supporting this blog by purchasing our newest conflation — Best of David Boles, Blogs: Volume 6 (2015) — to help cover our yearly bandwidth and server costs! You may read some of the best writing over the past year in this book from David Boles, Janna Sweenie and a newly unearthed gem from the forever magnificent Howard Stein!

BUY NOW!

Read More

RelationShaping

Writing a Journal of Memories: The Education of a Teacher

[Publisher’s Note: What you see on this page is the beginning of a publication project Dr. Howard Stein was preparing for David Boles Blogs in the year 2000 upon the celebration of the occasion of his birth — July 4 — when he was 78-years-old. We have unearthed this early draft of — The Howard Stern Journal of Memories — and we share it with you today so you may not only enjoy Dr. Stein’s wisdom, but also revel in the revision process you can see below in an image of his typewritten submission. You may view a larger size of the image on the Boles.com Howard Stein Archive Page.

Howard’s health began to nag him as the days aged, and he never returned to this project, but you may still read a lot of Dr. Stein’s work here, there and elsewhere. Howard Stein died on October 12, 2012 of heart failure. He was 90. We miss him every moment of every notion and it is amazing that 15 years after he wrote this for us, Howard is still publishing with us from the grave. Howard Stein always said he was “born lucky” — and so, too, are we lucky to have this article! — but this is his story.]

Read More

WordPunk

Building a Boles Bookshelf

There is one undeniable delight in writing: You are able to preserve what you know, defend the facts of your knowing, reconcile the truth, and create your own bookshelf of your life’s work. There is a great moral duty and an ongoing human wondering in the task of the living author — one that must not be slighted in practice or disparaged in theory — even when the current events of the day and the damnation of history are upon us.

Read More

United Stage

A Brand New Boles Book for the Playwright in Society

Yes, today is a Day for Fools — but there’s no joking around that I now have a brand new Boles Book for the Playwright in Society — available for purchase from David Boles Books Writing & Publishing! This Boles Book for… is a thoughtful compilation of a lot of my writing on how the Playwright derives power and structure from the fabric of belonging.

BUY NOW!

Read More

10txt

How to Write a Boles Book: Call for Authors!

As the publisher of David Boles Blogs and David Boles Books Writing & Publishing since 1991, I am often asked by others to publish their works.  I’ve always been a little concerned doing that because the only way for me to effectively to publish someone else is exclusively and virtually and not under the complication of paper. Today, I introduce to you, Writing a Boles Book — a precis for learning!

BUY NOW!

Read More

Boles Blogs

2015: The Year of Wonderment and Infection

2015 is not only upon us, but within us, and in the reflexive examination of the year that was, 2014 appears as a sort of bland monument of stasis in the evolution of living. Sure, there were killings and wars and disease and stalemates — and yet it all seemed alarmingly familiar as if we’d already lived all those cultural queues in previous quotations. 2015, so far at least, has a different taste and smell — and there may be some hope of anticipation that some exciting forward movement will be arriving to penetrate the world with some goodness and wonderment.

Read More