Don’t let anyone tell you a blog post titled “Man Titties” won’t bring you great Google search return results! Behold below the latest Google Analytics click through report for this blog:

 Titties in the Top Spot


I’m not sure if I should be proud of my high “Titties” placement or if
I should be hanging my typing hands in shame. I suppose I should find a
way to work “Titties” into a blog post title at least once a week!

Other fascinations on the list include the varied “Indian Outcast” searches and Tamela’s Intervention.
I’m surprised my reviews of the Gillette Fusion, Effudex, the Samsung a900 and Nike Free 5.0‘s still hold such high placement. Don’t let anyone tell you reviews aren’t popular and evergreen!

I am pleased to see “JJ Armes” in the list and I am still chuckling my Carrie Ann Inaba
— NON-naked — bash is still getting hit.
I wonder if the people doing these searches realize all their returns
are being logged and analyzed in a database somewhere for future use
and exploitation.
If you type it on the Internet, your thoughts belong to the world and
never again to you alone.

17 Comments

  1. Hi David,
    Congratulations on the stats!
    I decided to take a look at my stats and I noticed that I’m getting search engine traffic for things that were posted in April. Of course, I started my new blog in April, so I assume it was in the “Google sandbox” for a little while.
    It was the very act of looking at my keyword activity that convinced me I should enter into my niche when I first started blogging. I had intended to make a “thought blog” about important issues of the day facing my area, such as local government corruption and other things that were big topics of discussion. My traffic was exclusive obtained through Blogexplosion.
    Every so often, I’d blog about a topic in my niche. Whenever I did that, I’d get search engine traffic and my numbers would jump.
    When I was writing about local stuff, the “organic” numbers would drop like a rock.
    I once I figured out what people were interested in reading and what I was interested in writing about, I decided to make another blog.
    It took off after about three months — the “Google sandbox effect” always slows down new blogs. If I posted something and the person ended up on the news or in the gossip columns, the numbers would spike.
    It’s always interesting to look at traffic stats to see where people are coming from.
    Interest in my niche mostly attracts people from the U.S., I saw today my Google Analytics report shows Nairobi, Santiago and Zagreb each account for 0.15% for my traffic. Singapore keeps connected with 0.18%. Mixing European and Middle Eastern cultures, Istanbul comes in at 0.20%. Berlin and Paris are in the .20% ranges, with 0.25% and 0.28%, respectively!
    I even see I had three visits from Iran.
    In all, 93 countries are represented in my latest Google Analytics report.
    It’s also good to see where traffic is coming from. About 33% comes from Google and another 33% comes from other search engines and the second generation website that has referral links to the newer one.
    If you want traffic, keep going for the reviews and the “tittie” stories.
    People from all over the world love that kind of stuff!

  2. Hi Chris!
    Thanks for sharing your site statistics! I am always fascinated to see who and what gets action on a blog. It’s interesting that some of the reviews here are popular while most of them are not.
    I suppose if I had the choice of writing a review that might be outdated in a few weeks or taking real time to write something important, I will always err on the side of trying to post something here that has interest in people rather than products.
    I’m not so much interested in traffic as I am in comments.
    :mrgreen:
    People read the “Titties” story but they don’t post any new comments. I’d rather only have commenters as readers than readers who never comment.
    I try not to even look at those search returns – I hit the wrong button and saw it and couldn’t turn away — because they can skew your intent in a bad way sometimes — TITTIES ALL THE TIME! — and meander you away from your calling and the purpose of the blog.
    Everyone can write and comment about Titties — but few can handle a hardcore conversation about American Madrassas.
    If you’re out to make money and win eyes — heck, forget talking about TITTIES and show ’em and every other naughty bit! You’ll make a million!

  3. I was digging deep into my statistics and I discovered I had some visits from eop.gov.
    I tried plugging it into my browser, and nothing came up, except a message that “server cannot be found.”
    I took a look on Google and found this little story about eop.gov:

    Now, any sensible U.S. citizens will of course speculate that the “EOP” in eop.gov probably stands for something like “Executive Office of the President”; but, being sensible, s/he will doublecheck by, say looking at the site. Unfortunately, https://sawho14.eop.gov/ will refer the citizen back to the White House’s site. And there aren’t any webservers running under http://eop.gov or http://www.eop.gov. But said citizen, being diligent as well, will then turn to http://www.nic.gov for the straight dope, only to be confronted with a clickwrappian offer that can’t be refused (because there’s only an “agree” button):
    Warning! Use of this site is restricted!
    This computer system is for the use of the United States Government. Unauthorized access, or access which exceeds authorized access is punishable under 18 USC 1030.
    After agreeing and a few clicks on this nicely designed site, the citizen will learn that the domain eop.gov is “not available for registration” and that it’s status is “active.” But what s/he won’t learn is who the registrant actually is. Now, like our president, I am absolutely certain that someone could gad about all over the net to find out what EOP is. But who knows what kind of misinformation one might find on random web pages put up by those kooks who use the net…like the ones at ComputerWire who reported in September 2002 that VeriSign had restricted whois info for the .gov TLD. For security reasons, of course.
    So one just has to trust — without verifying.

    I assume if I pass muster with China’s and the Middle Eastern versions of Google, I hope I can past the test with the government.
    Maybe someone in the “EOP” likes reading my website!

  4. Hi David,
    You are right to write about the subjects that generate passion within yourself and others. That’s the only way to blog. Otherwise, it’s just work and we all have enough real work to keep us busy!
    I’ve found I have fun and also get traffic doing what I do. It’s nice to have reinforcement that others are actually reading what I’m writing. 🙂

  5. I did a quick whois check on dotgov.gov and found information on eop.gov.
    It isn’t top secret, which is a good thing.

    Currently, EOP.GOV is not available for registration.
    EOP.GOV
    Executive Office of the President
    Domain Name: EOP.GOV
    Status: Active
    Technical POC:
    202-395-5701
    Domain servers in listed order:
    NS1-AUTH.SPRINTLINK.NET 206.228.179.10
    NS2-AUTH.SPRINTLINK.NET 144.228.254.10
    NS2-AUTH.SPRINTLINK.NET 206.228.254.10
    NS3-AUTH.SPRINTLINK.NET 144.228.255.10

  6. Chris —
    It looks like the eop.gov domain is the “real” government site – mainly for secure email — that is protected behind a firewall from all the “open” website addresses for the government.
    I see addresses for:
    oup.eop.gov
    omb.eop.gov
    ustr.eop.gov
    who.eop.gov
    whc.eop.gov
    ntsc.eop.gov
    and so on…
    I even saw an eop.gov.us address!

  7. I found this as well:
    >host -al whitehouse.gov
    ————————————————————
    whitehouse.gov. SOA eopc.eop.gov. postmaster.eopc.eop.gov. (
    9912095 ;serial (version)
    10800 ;refresh period (3 hours)
    3600 ;retry interval (1 hour)
    604800 ;expire time (1 week)
    10800 ;default ttl (3 hours)
    )
    whitehouse.gov. NS dnsauth1.sys.gtei.net.
    whitehouse.gov. NS dnsauth2.sys.gtei.net.
    whitehouse.gov. NS dnsauth3.sys.gtei.net.
    whitehouse.gov. MX 100 whc.eop.gov.
    whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.91
    whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.92
    library.whitehouse.gov. CNAME http://www.whitehouse.gov.
    docs.whitehouse.gov. CNAME http://www.whitehouse.gov.
    localhost.whitehouse.gov. A 127.0.0.1
    pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.100
    pub.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    pub2.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.101
    pub2.pub.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    pub3.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 128.52.33.22
    pub3.pub.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    www6.pub.whitehouse.gov. CNAME pub6.pub.whitehouse.gov.
    host6.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.103
    pub5.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.102
    pub6.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.104
    pub6.pub.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    pub.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.100
    pub.pub.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    www1.pub.whitehouse.gov. CNAME pub1.pub.whitehouse.gov.
    http://www.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.100
    http://www.pub.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    www2.pub.whitehouse.gov. CNAME pub2.pub.whitehouse.gov.
    host1.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.98
    www3.pub.whitehouse.gov. CNAME pub3.pub.whitehouse.gov.
    host2.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.99
    host3.pub.whitehouse.gov. CNAME vesuvius.ai.mit.edu.
    realpub.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.100
    pub1.pub.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.100
    pub1.pub.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    www0.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 www0.whitehouse.gov.
    www0.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.88
    mm1.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.94
    www1.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.91
    www1.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    http://www.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.91
    http://www.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.92
    http://www.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    uucp-relay.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 relay2.uu.net.
    uucp-relay.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 relay1.uu.net.
    www2.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.92
    www2.whitehouse.gov. MX 500 whc.eop.gov.
    w001.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.66
    www3.whitehouse.gov. CNAME www0.whitehouse.gov.
    cyclops.whitehouse.gov. A 198.137.240.70
    whitehouse.gov. SOA eopc.eop.gov. postmaster.eopc.eop.gov. (
    9912095 ;serial (version)
    10800 ;refresh period (3 hours)
    3600 ;retry interval (1 hour)
    604800 ;expire time (1 week)
    10800 ;default ttl (3 hours)
    )
    http://www.cs.utsa.edu/~sdykes/cs6543/dns/DNS.whitehouse.gov

  8. This is interesting from a Columbia report on Email security:
    Email Faking
    host -t mx whitehouse.gov
    whitehouse.gov mail is handled (pri=100) by storm.eop.gov
    telnet storm.eop.gov 25
    Trying 198.137.241.51…
    Connected to storm.eop.gov.
    Escape character is ’]
    220 Storm.EOP.GOV — Server ESMTP (PMDF V5.1-7 #6879)
    helo erlang.cs.umass.edu
    250 Storm.EOP.GOV OK, [128.59.27.35].
    mail from: hgs@somewhere.org
    250 2.5.0 Address Ok.
    rcpt to: hgs@cs.columbia.edu
    250 2.1.5 hgs@cs.columbia.edu OK.
    data
    354 Enter mail, end with a single “.”.
    a test
    .

  9. This is from the same Columbia report:
    Email Tracing
    Received: from cs.columbia.edu (cs.columbia.edu [128.59.10.13]) by
    opus.cs.columbia.edu (8.8.5/8.6.6) with ESMTP id PAA07654 for
    ; Thu, 10 Apr 1997 15:30:03 -0400 (EDT)
    Received: from Storm.EOP.GOV (SYSTEM@storm.eop.gov [198.137.241.51])
    by cs.columbia.edu (8.8.5/8.6.6) with ESMTP id PAA16005
    for ; Thu, 10 Apr 1997 15:29:58 -0400 (EDT)
    Received: from erlang.cs.umass.edu ([128.59.27.35]) by STORM.EOP.GOV
    (PMDF V5.1-7 #6879) with SMTP id <01IHJN1HAVHE000TEO@STORM.EOP.GOV> for
    hgs@cs.columbia.edu; Thu, 10 Apr 1997 15:29:42 EDT
    From: hgs@somewhere.org
    Date: Thu, 10 Apr 1997 15:29:42 -0400 (EDT)
    Date-warning: Date header was inserted by STORM.EOP.GOV
    To: hgs@opus.cs.columbia.edu
    Message-ID: <01IHJN3GBO8Q000TEO@STORM.EOP.GOV>
    MIME-version: 1.0
    Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=US-ASCII
    Content-Length: 8

  10. This is an old topic, but I do have to add:
    “Man titty” in my experience is a very common phrase used by WOMEN (and especially readers of romance novels) to poke fun at the men who show up on the stereotypical romance novel cover. It’s often meant as a satirical comment on the phenomenon.
    As I’m sure most people realize, there is a common belief that all romance novels are unredeemable dreck and that all romance readers are, well, not very bright, attractive, intelligent, or capable, and are only reading romance novels because of their pathetic empty lives. This stereotype continues even though countless studies have been done showing that romance readers tend to be happier and better educated and have higher incomes than the average American, and that romance novels are by far the most popular form of fiction in North America.
    One of the reasons for this, I think, are the covers that publishers force on romance writers. Unless you’re a Nora Roberts you don’t have any say in what cover your book is given. And the (male) publishers just love to stick half-naked guys on covers. I suppose the m.t. parade makes it easier for readers to find romance novels among the other genre fiction, but it’s rather funny.
    As for the other reasons why even the best romance fiction is so badly and unfairly stigmatized, I leave it to you. Personally I think there’s a real prejudice against stories where women are written as real people and not just plot points or eye candy for the real, important, male characters. Also, people in this decade don’t seem to like happy endings or stories about relationships.
    Oh, and if anybody’s wondering: only about 3 to 5% of romance novels are published by Harlequin. There are over 50 publishers in the romance market in the US alone. 44% of fiction sold in the US is romance fiction. Too often people assume that Harlequin = romance.