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Letter to Heaven

by Tammy Tillotson

“All uncertainty is fruitful… so long as it is accompanied
by the wish to understand.” —Antonio Machado

Dear God:

Hello again. It’s just me, but of course you probably already knew that. Some of your faithful church followers have informed me that my presence is greatly missed on Sundays. I have been assured that you are quite disappointed in me as a result of my poor attendance record. Though I was saddened by the reactions of these followers, I have not changed my decision to rejoin your congregation. I do not expect these individuals to accept my thoughts and feelings, but I felt compelled to share my perspective with you.

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On Being Human, Part 2: Exceeding the Limits of Understanding

by Tammy Tillotson

To be human is to exist, within the limits of present human knowledge, as the apogee of the food chain, while simultaneously epitomizing and encompassing all aspects of the duality of nature in all its vast forms… So what? What does that really mean to me?

Life Lessons
I paid enough attention in 11th grade English to add apogee to the lexicon of my seemingly endless mental dictionary of contradictions. I believe the exact words the professor scrawled in red were something to the effect of “if this is the apogee of your writing efforts I suggest you make an appointment to see me about withdrawing.”

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On Being Human: Within the Limits of Understanding

by Tammy Tillotson

“The Answer to Human Life
Is not to be found within the Limits
Of Human Life.”— C. G. Jung

To be human is to exist, within the limits of present human knowledge, as the apogee of the food chain, while simultaneously epitomizing and encompassing all aspects of the duality of nature in all its vast forms.

Comprehending Human Nature
Comprehension of human nature is solely limited to the understanding of manifestations that have been created and defined throughout history in order to achieve or rather establish a sense of order within an otherwise chaotic environment.

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Reparation for Native Americans: Another Trail of Tears

by Tammy Tillotson

Native Americans were here first. We took their land while generously doling out reservations for their people who survived to live on. Considering a moral sense of fairness, perhaps we now owe them some other form of reparation in order to exemplify a more universal concept of reciprocity. After all, the Native Americans were the ones who did us a favor. Shouldn’t we feel morally obligated to return the favor?

Reparation and Reciprocity
Reparation is compensation payable by a defeated nation for damages or loss caused during war. Federally recognized Indian tribes have the legal status of “defeated nations,” and the Federal government has legal responsibility to protect and promote their welfare. Since the Indian tribes classify as “defeated nations,” the issue arises whether or not they should be financially compensated for the great losses their people have suffered as a result of colonization.

The idea of monetary reparation is not a new concept, yet it partially stems from the notion that America is divided and is in need of healing. In an attempt to turn suffering into healing, money is the solution, which yields the reciprocity of fairness. Money can buy anything these days, and the notion is beyond absurd and appalling. Justice is not served by silencing voices, and money cannot buy or return dignity and self-respect.

If Native Americans were to accept any form of monetary reparation from the Federal government, it would simply undermine what self-respect they have suffered to successfully maintain. Accepting compensation would yield the idea that the debt has been paid in full, when, in fact, there is no possible way to repay Native Americans. It will simply make the Federal government happy in knowing that the Native Americans have been pacified, and they should have nothing else to complain about, when indeed they do.

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Cochlear Devices & the Deaf Community: Hearing Within

by Tammy Tillotson

“I saw clearly that it was useless to try to teach her language or anything else until she learned to obey me. I have thought about it a great deal, and the more I think, the more certain I am that obedience is the gateway through which knowledge, yes, and love, too, enter the mind of a child.” — Anne Sullivan, teacher of Helen Keller

Cochlear Devices: An Obedient Decision
As medical professionals have found that deaf children between the ages of one to three are more likely to respond well to cochlear implants, will this parental decision of technological obedience adversely affect the child’s experience within the Deaf Community and Culture?

The answer is largely a matter of personal perspective based on two main arguments.

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World Trade Center: Recreating Towers of Iron & Irony

by Tammy Tillotson

According to discussions at the annual fall meeting of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) held in Boston, Massachusetts on October 3-6, 2001, rebuilding the World Trade Center is already in the preliminary planning stages.

As rebuilding is now a near certainty, the question becomes whether or not the World Trade Center should be rebuilt precisely as it was before, or should it be something entirely different?

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A Mentally Disabled Evolution on the Value of Human Life

by Tammy Tillotson

Modern advances in science and medicine are redefining human perceptions concerning the extent of power and control that can be exercised over the evolution and reproduction of the human species. As population control has become a pressing issue for many countries, attempts to curb increasing density statistics has raised the scientific and ethical issue of which human lives are, in essence, more evolutionarily important for survival of the species.

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