1984: Murder in F-flat at the Daily Nebraskan

1984 was an interesting time to be alive, because you felt, every day, as if you were living in the George Orwell novel of the same name. Reagan was president, and the world seemed to be collapsing around you — likely just as many of us feel today with another, repressive, Republican president. 1984 also happened to be the year I started writing for the Daily Nebraskan — the school newspaper for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. I was a Sophomore in 1984, and I was writing a weekly, serialized, novel called “Murder in F-Flat” — in the wake of Mark Twain, and others like him — and the effort was curious, odd, joyful, frustrating, and purely delightful.

1984 was the dawn of the Personal Computer Age, and while we could save electronic copies of our writing, the work was stored on a fragile 5 1/4″ floppy disk that was kept in a sleeve because its magnetic surface was exposed to the elements. You wrote on the computer, printed out your articles, handed in the paper, and an editor retyped what you wrote into their computer. Yes, you saved what you wrote, but retrieving it later, was an issue then, as it is now; so when I discovered yesterday that the Daily Nebraskan archives for 1984-1987 were now online, I pounded my memory to try to remember when, and what, I wrote in 1984; and the key to the memory trick was my 1984 September 28 pay stub from the Daily Nebraskan. I remembered a check was cut for us every 30 days and each article paid $10.

My search began, and ended, in money — and now I present to you what I was able to find — four FIVE installments of “Murder in F-flat” by Dave Boles! I think a couple of episodes are missing from the online archive; I will keep an eye on that Daily Neb portal, and if the other stories flash into the now from the past, I will dutifully update this article! If you prefer a larger version to read, please head over to my Boles.com Periodicals Archive.

August 22, 1984
(UPDATE: 5-31-10 — I found the first installment!)

August 31, 1984
Too bad you can’t see the whole graphic logo for the column — and today, you’d never want a graphic byline, because your name would never index online as text — “Murder in F-flat” is stylized, and hand-drawn, and I wish I could remember the artist’s name. I just realized now, the pen doing the writing, is being held the wrong way, and is actually stabbing me, the author, in the chest. Murder, indeed! The opening reference to “last week” tells me at least one previous episode installment is missing, so we’re leaping into the story mid-stream.

Continue reading → 1984: Murder in F-flat at the Daily Nebraskan

Editorial Paranoia: I Know a Penis When I Read One

The role of the editor is an important one.  A good editor is more facilitator than censor.  When I am editing the precious work of other writers, I always try to cling to their clarity instead of embossing my prejudices and belief systems into the work.  Editors must honor the author’s original intention while also respecting the sense of a universal perception that what has been written can easily be read and understood.

Continue reading → Editorial Paranoia: I Know a Penis When I Read One

Quantifying the Freshly Pressed Effect on WordPress.com and How to Get Featured

Yesterday, at 10:00am Eastern my article — American Folklore and The Blues Black Cat Bone — was featured on WordPress.com’s Freshly Pressed.  It was a great and grand honor to be selected and here’s my reward letter from the Freshly Pressed editrix:

Continue reading → Quantifying the Freshly Pressed Effect on WordPress.com and How to Get Featured

Condemning Editorial Censorship

It’s always disappointing when a writer has their work censored by an editor.  One should always be wary of publishers that value editors more than authors.

How do you handle the wants and desires of an editor with an obvious internal agenda who wishes to wound and harm the project with false self-elevation, political correctitude and sanctimonious righteousness?

Continue reading → Condemning Editorial Censorship