I was disappointed you so easily let go of your brilliance. It is important for you as an artist to not compromise, to not give in to lesser ideas, and for you to fight for your aesthetic.

The price of that fight may be unhappy people but you must find a way to convince them that “even though you don’t see it, trust me that I see it” and inspire them follow you. I know most of your group was on your side.

If there were some who refused to go along with your genius because they have not been as well trained as you or because they are not as smart as you… then you need to find a way to negate their negative influence.

Place them in smaller roles. Place them on edges. Have them tread water while the rest of you create and sustain and serve the brilliance of your idea.

It was said of the great American Playwright Eugene O’Neill that he had the power to see light during the day that others could only see at night. That means that the stars in the sky were always visible to O’Neill and he had the capacity for sharing that light at any time. He did not have to wait for darkness to fall to provide the beauty of illumination.

You have the potential to one day be in O’Neill’s league and the challenge of the rest of your life is to work with others who may be blind to your brilliance and then provide them a means of understanding your path so they can follow into your everlasting light.

Good luck!

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