Happy New Year from Urban Semiotic!

Urban Semiotic Colors!

It’s time once again to do a review of who and what we are and where we want to go in the future as we formally set down our Urban Semiotic Resolutions and Predictions for 2007


2007 Urban Semiotic Predictions

1). Our Spam count will double to 50,000 by March 1, 2006 and probably
hit 500,000 by year’s end.

2). Our Reader count will double to 250,000 by March 1, 2006 and, we
hope, to over a million by year’s end. The reader stats seem to come
and go willy-nilly and without reason so this prediction may be harder
to nail down.

3). We will continue to redefine the meaning of an “Urban Semiotic”
in new and dramatic ways.

4). Three, regular, beloved, everyday commenters will disappear and
stop commenting. We will never hear from them again and we will always
wonder what happened to them and why they left.

5). Six less regular, but similarly intellectual and reliable
commenters will replace those who disappear.

6). WordPress.com will continue to explode in power and popularity and add new beta features for us to test and bang on and our “reader experience
will be faster and better for the effort but those enhancements will
not be without a price.

7). We — I — will begin to pay more and bigger real money for more
services and to keep advertising off this WordPress.com hosted blog
unless there is a better reason to allow shilling.

8). We will forge new links and new relationships with people and other
blogs across the globe and we will continue to seek your help in
getting the word out about our mission here and to help us get links to
this blog.

9). We will have a WordPress.com provided “Donate Credits Now” widget
for the sidebar that will allow readers to donate credits via PayPal
to help pay for the cost of the extra for-pay features that will begin
to appear on this blog. We — I — have already paid real money for the
Custom CSS upgrade and for domain mapping.

10). There will be a conservative movement threaded in terrorism to
shut down blogs that the Department of Homeland Security decides are
threats to national security. WordPress.com and other entities that
believe in freedom of the mind will be forced to move their servers to
Canada — and other friendly countries — that will not repress free
speech.

2007 Urban Semiotic Resolutions

1). We need to get
more of our previous authors writing articles again on a more regular
basis.

2). We will continue to post a new article here every single day.

3). We will continue to be provocative, proactive and predictive when
it comes to exposing the dangers of living in the city core.

4). We will never bend to those who try to censor us.

5). We will actively solicit the work of brand new authors who have
been silently reading this blog for over a year without ever
commenting.

6). We will work to keep our intellectualism and our emotionalism on
equal and important planes.

7). We will never give in to sloth, or contempt or poor taste or a deformed aesthetic.

8).
We will continue to keep our comments thoughtful and helpful and never
nasty or ill-toned.

9). We will always promote the underdog over the overlord.

10). We will argue against Bad Things and the promotion of damaging
policies: We shall never be silent; We are always vigilant.

Now it’s your turn!

You are a valued reader here — and, we hope, a cogent commenter — so
what are your Urban Semiotic Predictions and Resolutions? If you’ve
never posted a comment before, now is your chance to be heard!
What would you like to see happen here in scope, intention and coverage
— and how do you plan to make yourself available to be a positive part
of this upward progression into greatness?

53 Comments

  1. David, wish you a very happy 2007 and long live Urban Semiotic!
    I can surely predict that we will see more interesting articles here which will intrigue us more.
    A wishful thinking – will like to see more writers with different perspectives.
    Resolution – will write more regularly ( I am deliberately not using the word ‘try’ because ‘trying’ doesn’t help.)

  2. Katha!
    Thank you for the good holiday wishes.
    I appreciate you not using the “try” word just for the very prescient reasons you so rightly state!
    😀
    Tell us what subjects you might decide to cover in the New Year…

  3. I plan on not being one of those disappearing comment makers but rather a steady contributer – as a good beginning, I have finally answered your meme here 🙂
    Whatever article would not properly fit as a GO Inside Magazine article shall be submitted for your approval here.
    I agree with Katha – not try. Do or do not – there is no try. Thanks, Yoda.

  4. Well done, Gordon! I am surprised by your smoking and Romania revelations. Keen stuff, that! Way to go!
    We want more of you here in comments and in articles!
    😀
    You should put a link from your meme to the original meme here so your readers will be able to follow the provenance!

  5. Well done, Gordon! I am surprised by your smoking and Romania revelations. Keen stuff, that! Way to go!
    We want more of you here in comments and in articles!
    😀
    You should put a link from your meme to the original meme here so your readers will be able to follow the provenance!

  6. I am going to stand up for those that try – as I have done over the past 9 months or so to contribute to a blog that interests me greatly but emanates from such a different environment (urban , city, American, gun toting, knife weilding) than mine. (UK, rural, peaceful).
    If I hadnt “tried” on many occassions to find the words – I doubt if I would have been writing this now.
    There are times when I have no point of reference at all to contribute from/to in the original post – if I didnt TRY – I wouldnt return later to see how things had developed and to see if I could find a point of reference to contribute from.
    For me *trying* is a fundamental part of my contribution here. Trying to understand a very different environment, trying to find the right words, trying to find the research to back up what I say – and of course being very *trying* in the process
    🙂

  7. I am going to stand up for those that try – as I have done over the past 9 months or so to contribute to a blog that interests me greatly but emanates from such a different environment (urban , city, American, gun toting, knife weilding) than mine. (UK, rural, peaceful).
    If I hadnt “tried” on many occassions to find the words – I doubt if I would have been writing this now.
    There are times when I have no point of reference at all to contribute from/to in the original post – if I didnt TRY – I wouldnt return later to see how things had developed and to see if I could find a point of reference to contribute from.
    For me *trying* is a fundamental part of my contribution here. Trying to understand a very different environment, trying to find the right words, trying to find the research to back up what I say – and of course being very *trying* in the process
    🙂

  8. Hi David,
    Happy New Year!
    My goal will be to write when I am struck with an idea. It’s too easy to hear or think about a great topic and then get caught up in the daily routine of life and forget to write about it. I think I’ve told you about three or four things that I haven’t gotten around to writing about yet.
    I’d make a resolution to experiment with podcasting, but I’ve heard two quality podcasters say it takes about five hours of editing to make one hour of top notch work — not including the time it took to write the script. Of course, those authors are reading their manuscripts for their books.
    My New Year’s Predictions
    1. Some celebrity will be arrested trying to adopt a foreign baby.
    2. The Middle East will see peace for at least a 1/2 hour period.
    3. Britney Spears will be spotted wearing an Urban Semiotic classic thong. Readership will increase by another 250,000 after People Magazine runs the photos.
    Blessings and wishes for a great New Year for everyone reading this!

  9. Hi David,
    Happy New Year!
    My goal will be to write when I am struck with an idea. It’s too easy to hear or think about a great topic and then get caught up in the daily routine of life and forget to write about it. I think I’ve told you about three or four things that I haven’t gotten around to writing about yet.
    I’d make a resolution to experiment with podcasting, but I’ve heard two quality podcasters say it takes about five hours of editing to make one hour of top notch work — not including the time it took to write the script. Of course, those authors are reading their manuscripts for their books.
    My New Year’s Predictions
    1. Some celebrity will be arrested trying to adopt a foreign baby.
    2. The Middle East will see peace for at least a 1/2 hour period.
    3. Britney Spears will be spotted wearing an Urban Semiotic classic thong. Readership will increase by another 250,000 after People Magazine runs the photos.
    Blessings and wishes for a great New Year for everyone reading this!

  10. Hi Nicola!
    Thanks for the comment. We’ve talked a lot here in the long past about deeds or wishing — actions over trying — so that’s the genesis of the aversion to “trying” you’re seeing expressed here because too often it means the work doesn’t get done in the end. Promises are worth nothing if they aren’t backed up by appropriate “done did it!”
    😀

  11. Hi Nicola!
    Thanks for the comment. We’ve talked a lot here in the long past about deeds or wishing — actions over trying — so that’s the genesis of the aversion to “trying” you’re seeing expressed here because too often it means the work doesn’t get done in the end. Promises are worth nothing if they aren’t backed up by appropriate “done did it!”
    😀

  12. Chris!
    Huzzah! I love all your predictions! Yay!
    I like your drive to want to finish your excellent ideas. I know you’re busy. You have let a few gems slip by without submitted them after telling me an article was forthcoming…
    😀
    I’M HOLDING THUMBS ALL YOUR PREDICTIONS COME TRUE! Love the thong, too!
    :mrgreen:

  13. David- i predict people in the U.S. will adopt their own language and philosophy. That language being English with the “negative” words and concepts handed back to the English if they still want them. “Try” has the chance of “negative” results and that is the chief objection to that word. “Hope” is similar, and in ancient Greece if someone had “hope” he would most likely be stomped for being a wimp. “Problem” is another useless word. Why not look at everything as being determined by something greater that humans, and have respect for it, instead of arrogance; thinking this is “wrong,” “evil” etc. If one makes no appointments, one will never be disappointed, or at least realise “who am i to tell the greatest powers what should be.” Instead of “mistake” why not see it as a lesson. What ever can be stated negatively can be stated positvely. “Negativity” built into the current language leads to dualism and scapegoating and leading us around in an endless circle that could just as easily be replaced with a logrhythmical spiral as is found in nature that will move us upward and onward in the intended fasion. The U.S. seems to be the only major country without our own language, or philosophy. Our major contribution to culture seems to have been jazz, and that is not even considered culture by most of the mainstream. To master a language, it is going to have to be our own, and the philosophy that is unified with it.

  14. I agree with Chris, I will write or make a note when/if a certain idea strikes me. I am more of a spontaneous person, not much of a big planner. Moreover, life has a tendency to play pranks by jeopardizing my long term planning – so no pre planned topic David!
    Hi Nicola – ditto with David! We had a discussion about ‘trying’ here which actually meant ‘wishing but not finishing’…:D
    What you meant by ‘trying’ is actually ‘wishing and doing’ – or else you wouldn’t have come back!

  15. Hi fred!
    Excellent advice for the New Year, thanks!
    What you say also applies to proposals. You are never negative, “We will not disappoint you.” You instead always choose the positive, “We will get it done.” You recognize the duality of the language and you always choose the positive end you want.

  16. That is another reason it is sometimes difficult to contribute – the different meanings and emphasis in the use of language as well as different expectations.
    We have a saying “if at first you don’t suceed, try try again. ” which originates from the Robert the Bruce Legend.
    “According to legend, after his defeat at Methven and the subsequent incarceration of his family, Bruce hid himself in a cave, which is located near Gretna and can still be visited today. While in the cave, Bruce observed a spider trying to spin a web. Each time the spider failed, it simply started all over again. Inspired by this, Bruce returned to inflict a series of defeats on the English, thus winning him more supporters and eventual victory. The story serves to explain the maxim: “if at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.” Other versions have Bruce defeated for the seventh time by the English, then let him watch the spider spin seven webs, fail, then spin an eighth and succeed.
    However, this legend only appears for the first time in a much later account, “Tales of a Grandfather” by Sir Walter Scott, and may have originally been told about his companion-in-arms Sir James Douglas (the Black Douglas). ”
    (source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I_of_Scotland )

  17. That is another reason it is sometimes difficult to contribute – the different meanings and emphasis in the use of language as well as different expectations.
    We have a saying “if at first you don’t suceed, try try again. ” which originates from the Robert the Bruce Legend.
    “According to legend, after his defeat at Methven and the subsequent incarceration of his family, Bruce hid himself in a cave, which is located near Gretna and can still be visited today. While in the cave, Bruce observed a spider trying to spin a web. Each time the spider failed, it simply started all over again. Inspired by this, Bruce returned to inflict a series of defeats on the English, thus winning him more supporters and eventual victory. The story serves to explain the maxim: “if at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.” Other versions have Bruce defeated for the seventh time by the English, then let him watch the spider spin seven webs, fail, then spin an eighth and succeed.
    However, this legend only appears for the first time in a much later account, “Tales of a Grandfather” by Sir Walter Scott, and may have originally been told about his companion-in-arms Sir James Douglas (the Black Douglas). ”
    (source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_I_of_Scotland )

  18. Hi Nicola —
    I understand your disconnect — or our disconnect.
    😀
    We’re fond of saying here in this forum, “if at first you don’t succeed, get it done the second time.”
    We realize that philosophy is not popular in the mythic international Work Ethic or the contretemps of achieving the singular American Dream, but we feel it should be part of a new national mantra and that merely “trying” over and over and over again is what puts humans into great peril across the world and into the realm of professional excuse-making.

  19. Hi Nicola —
    I understand your disconnect — or our disconnect.
    😀
    We’re fond of saying here in this forum, “if at first you don’t succeed, get it done the second time.”
    We realize that philosophy is not popular in the mythic international Work Ethic or the contretemps of achieving the singular American Dream, but we feel it should be part of a new national mantra and that merely “trying” over and over and over again is what puts humans into great peril across the world and into the realm of professional excuse-making.

  20. Hi David,
    If you look at history, the people who failed but kept trying are the ones we read about and study. The people who didn’t try the second or third time are the ones who faded away without making a mark on society.

  21. Hi David,
    If you look at history, the people who failed but kept trying are the ones we read about and study. The people who didn’t try the second or third time are the ones who faded away without making a mark on society.

  22. Happy New Year, David.
    I resolve to comment here more frequently this year. The problem is that many of your posts make me think too hard, and the resulting brain cramp makes me go lie down until the pain resolves. By which time, I’ve forgotten what I intended to say. 🙂
    May 2007 bring you and yours much good, and none ill.

  23. Happy New Year, David.
    I resolve to comment here more frequently this year. The problem is that many of your posts make me think too hard, and the resulting brain cramp makes me go lie down until the pain resolves. By which time, I’ve forgotten what I intended to say. 🙂
    May 2007 bring you and yours much good, and none ill.

  24. Hi David,
    Train not well, Yoda did. :mrgreen:
    In red, are the links, highlighted supposed to be?
    I couldn’t help going into Yoda speak.
    Back to the trying.
    Maybe it’s better to manage expectations — if I tell you I’ll get it done in a month, and finish the project in a week, you’ll be happy.
    If I tell you I’ll get the project done in a week, and it takes two, then you’ll be mad. 😉

  25. Hi David,
    Train not well, Yoda did. :mrgreen:
    In red, are the links, highlighted supposed to be?
    I couldn’t help going into Yoda speak.
    Back to the trying.
    Maybe it’s better to manage expectations — if I tell you I’ll get it done in a month, and finish the project in a week, you’ll be happy.
    If I tell you I’ll get the project done in a week, and it takes two, then you’ll be mad. 😉

  26. David, I’m curious. How much time do you devote to this blog? In your frank and prompt answer which I know will be quickly rendered, include time spent in research, actual posting, reading comments and responding.
    Thank you.
    s

  27. David, I’m curious. How much time do you devote to this blog? In your frank and prompt answer which I know will be quickly rendered, include time spent in research, actual posting, reading comments and responding.
    Thank you.
    s

  28. Chris!
    I got your last comment on my BlackBerry and I thought, “Oh, no! The CSS died or something and we lost our hotlink color!”
    😀
    Now I see you were Yoda-ing me around!
    :mrgreen:
    Expectation certainly has to be tempered, though “trying” is convenient and tremendously passive-aggressive today.
    “Chris, will you be in court today?
    “I’ll try.”
    You’re fired!
    “Chris, will you come in on Friday and finish your work?”
    “I’ll try.”
    You’re fired!
    “Chris, will you finish up your article soon?”
    “I’ll try.”
    Gets others fired up!
    😉

  29. Chris!
    I got your last comment on my BlackBerry and I thought, “Oh, no! The CSS died or something and we lost our hotlink color!”
    😀
    Now I see you were Yoda-ing me around!
    :mrgreen:
    Expectation certainly has to be tempered, though “trying” is convenient and tremendously passive-aggressive today.
    “Chris, will you be in court today?
    “I’ll try.”
    You’re fired!
    “Chris, will you come in on Friday and finish your work?”
    “I’ll try.”
    You’re fired!
    “Chris, will you finish up your article soon?”
    “I’ll try.”
    Gets others fired up!
    😉

  30. Hi Shirley!
    Thanks for the good wishes and Happy New Year!
    The diverse application of thoughts and ideas is what makes this place work. We don’t have to agree with each other but we’re pretty good at listening to those who speak their truth and who are also willing to defend it in a public forum on the record.
    As for the details of time spent on this blog — I don’t track things I enjoy.
    I only log things I loathe and I try to avoid loathsome things at all costs.
    If you press me, however, my answer is: 24 hours, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

  31. Hi Shirley!
    Thanks for the good wishes and Happy New Year!
    The diverse application of thoughts and ideas is what makes this place work. We don’t have to agree with each other but we’re pretty good at listening to those who speak their truth and who are also willing to defend it in a public forum on the record.
    As for the details of time spent on this blog — I don’t track things I enjoy.
    I only log things I loathe and I try to avoid loathsome things at all costs.
    If you press me, however, my answer is: 24 hours, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

  32. Hi David,
    My browser highlighted the links — but it had nothing to do with your CSS.
    I had forgotten that I had activated a little favelet that finds links that are marked “nofollow.” I was using it to check the links on my site that I don’t want search engines to follow .

  33. Hi David,
    My browser highlighted the links — but it had nothing to do with your CSS.
    I had forgotten that I had activated a little favelet that finds links that are marked “nofollow.” I was using it to check the links on my site that I don’t want search engines to follow .

  34. Hi David,
    It’s just showing what I saw with the “Display Nofollow” favelet application that made me think there was a CSS change on the site. It wasn’t your site, but my browser that was highlighting the links that used the “nofollow” html tag.
    It has limited use, but is one more little addition to the Firefox toolbar.
    I’m sure there are other applets that highlight other html tags for people with curious minds.