Chick-fil-A — a mainstream fast food restaurant and sponsor of a major football bowl game — believes it is a fundamental Christian enterprise first…

Cathy believes strongly that Christians are missionaries in the workplace. “Jesus had a lot of things to say about people who work and live in the business community,” he said. His goal in the workplace is “to take biblical truth and put skin on it. … We’re talking about how our performance in the workplace should be the focus of how we build respect, rapport and relationships with others that opens the gateway to interest people in knowing God.

“All throughout the New Testament there is an evangelism strategy related to our performance in the workplace. … Our work should be an act of worship. Our work should be our mission field. As long as we are stateside, let’s don’t think we have to go on mission trips by getting a passport. … If you’re obedient to God you are going to be evangelistic in the quality of the work you do, using that as a portal to share [Christ],” he said.

When asked if Chick-fil-A’s success is attributed to biblical values, Cathy quickly said, “I think they’re inseparable. God wants to give us wisdom to make good decisions and choices.” Quoting James 1:5, he spoke of how often he asks God for wisdom.

…and a loving company second, and that means putting Chick-fil-A profit into anti-gay efforts:

In early 2011, Chick-fil-A came under fire for its donations and political ties to a number of anti-gay groups. Though Chick-fil-A continues to deny supporting an anti-gay agenda, the company has donated over $3 million to organizations like the Family Research Council and Exodus International between 2003 and 2009. And in 2010 alone, Chick-fil-A donated over $1.9 million to anti-gay causes, more than any other year for which public records are available.

Now celebrities like Ed Helms are stepping forward to condemn Chick-fil-A for trying to be a mainstream American restaurant with a backward and cruel ecosystem that punishes people instead of pleasing them.

I have no problem with Chick-fil-A choosing to spend their money where they wish — I just want them to be upfront about their prejudice right from the jump and include their human biases in all their advertising so we can call know they are selling much more than chicken.  They’re selling hatred and intolerance, too.

I’m sure the Chick-fil-A Bowl will not be around in a year because the company now has the taint of a Gay-hating enterprise and the NCAA doesn’t like unnecessary controversy intended to divide and condemn only a certain niche of people, and the NCAA certainly doesn’t want to have a blood money sponsor using their national football platform used to spread a special brand of chicken-sponsored bigotry.

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