Poking the Red Eye

In a great civilian uprising against — the Panopticonic Red Light Camera — those unblinking red eyes are being closed in the polling place by voter fury.

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The Unbearable Lightness of Sammy

Baseball player and steroid user Sammy Sosa appears to now be hiding from his crimes against the game by changing his Race.  The dark-skinned Sosa is now the bright white Sammy.  Say it ain’t so, Sammy, say it ain’t so:

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On Becoming Question Centric

We live in a world where answers are given more value than the questions being asked.  We want results, not idle inquiry.  We reward the definite and the concrete while dismissing the unanswerable and the curious.  Today, I argue, the best of us really rests in the questions we ask and not in the answers we provide.  When Albert Einstein was a teenager, he asked this question:  “What would happen if I could imprison a ray of light?”  Nobody had the answer to his question.  For the rest of his life, he honored his own childhood wondering and brought the rest of us into his light.

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Stolen Eyes: Rage Against the Panopticon

Sometimes it takes a criminal act to set us free from the Panopticonic Eye of our government watchers. 

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Electric Erotica: How to Turn On Jesus

Who knew you could “turn on” Jesus with the flick of your finger?  I can’t decide if this Jesus-Light-Switch-With-Children semiotic is more or less offensive than our previous winner, The Unholy Blow Job.

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Sleeping with the Lights On

Do you sleep with the lights on?  Or do you require total darkness for your evening slumber?

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When Art Meets Science is it Always Art?

The San Francisco Chronicle asks a fine question about the legitimacy of art meeting science as we ponder the image of an electrograph of a brass wire gauge in the year 1900:

Should we consider “Brought to Light: Photography and the Invisible,
1840-1900
” an art exhibition just because the San Francisco Museum of
Modern Art has organized it?

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