My pussy is angry!” — and with the shouting of that infamous phrase today — every man in theatres across the country cringe in a nationally shared kick to the groin.
Yes, it’s that angry time of the year, again. V-Day. The Vagina Monologues Day. It’s the season when all men are fair game for pounding as women proclaim their power from the stage — under the guise of doing Good Deeds and charity — while the men around them nod their heads in assumed agreement as their minds drift away.


Sure, V-Day is a good thing if you don’t mind the shouting and the
belittling. One V-Day celebration in New York City is a benefit to
raise money for the disenfranchised.
The production is performed in American Sign Language so that will give the Angry Biting Vagina Rants a new taste twist that other years have lacked.

Oh, I’ll be there tonight — doing my duty
— I’ll be the one switching my hands between covering my balls and
cheering. I’ll applaud with my entire body as the Deaf performers strut
their Vagina Stuff.
I’m going to do everything possible to remember the mantra of the angry
pussy — less I get bitten where the sun don’t shine.

32 Comments

  1. sulz!
    Can you tell us more about the banning? Is the play still banned?
    Was the original banning done because of language or content or was it a masculine political power play to repress the free expression of women?

  2. um, it was a while back, as i’ve said. i think they banned it because of the usage of the word ‘vagina’… it wasn’t so much of the ‘girl power’ theme but the fact that they have to use words like ‘breasts’ or ‘vagina’ or whatever that seems rather vulgar to the conservative people in the censorship board. that’s to my rather limited knowledge, i must add.

  3. I never liked this play much. It was a lot of pussy talk and not much else. There was an agenda being pushed. Too bad because there were good ideas there.

  4. Brent —
    Ha! The “vaginas, vaginas, vaginas” weren’t so bad in the play — it was the other, ongoing, vulgar language that quickly became tiresome and would likely make a conservative community turn away in disinterest. That’s too bad because when you blue up the language just for shock sake, you risk losing more proper minds that might be open to your argument if they didn’t have to wade through all that cursing first.

  5. I try not to let language offend me. I’d like to think that I’m smarter than that. It’s the substance which matters most. Sometimes, language is a convenient replacement for substantial dialog.

  6. That’s what I’m saying. many times, especially in film, there is a lot of foul language, in replacement of good dialog. There are some exceptions of course, and sometimes it is the case that extreme language is used to show anger. Take the typical Quentin Tarantino film for instance. But sometimes there is way too much, and it is not necessary.
    A great example of someone who is completely entertaining without using foul language is Bill Cosby. His stand-up routine is hilarious and he is clean enough to watch with your children and your grandma.
    The reason that books rarely have a lot of bad language is because most authors that get published, are far more creative with words. Stephen King, one of my favorite modern American authors, uses foul language sometimes, but usually only to set the mood, or to continue it.
    But hey, people can say whatever they want. It sounds a lot more intelligent to me when you don’t drop f-bombs all the time.

  7. Yes, Brent, there is too much gratuitous cursing in modern culture and especially in the entertainment business. Have you watched VH1’s “The Agency” yet? It’s a fascinating look at the high fashion industry but the star — Becky — with her charming English accent drops the f-bomb and s-bomb at least three times in every sentence. The words are censored but it makes her entire dialogue a series of skips and beeps.
    I think it’s easier to take spoken bad language than to read it on the page. I used to be a Howard Stern fan. He’d curse on his show and it was funny. Then he wrote a couple of books and cursed right there on the page often and without remorse and it just came off tacky and tasteless. The eyes are a powerful tool.

  8. That’s pretty ironic, because I really thought coming over here there would be a lot of people cursing because I had seen lots of Brits cursing on TV. But I live in a dorm here, and I’ve barely heard any foul language at all, and certainly less than in the US.

  9. That’s pretty ironic, because I really thought coming over here there would be a lot of people cursing because I had seen lots of Brits cursing on TV. But I live in a dorm here, and I’ve barely heard any foul language at all, and certainly less than in the US.