I don’t understand tattoos.  I really do not understand designer tattoos.  What are we trying to remember? 

Designer Yu-Chiao Wang has come up with the idea of a Sun Tattoo. It is actually a ‘wearable’ cloth stencil – a robe, with a specific pattern. It requires staying long enough in the sun or having a good use of UV rays to leave on the skin a beautiful tattoo. The stencil covers only a part of your body allowing sun to hit certain areas.

Why do we need to modify our bodies?

Do we like teaching the skin to remember?

Do we prefer inflicting pain as the body is surgically modified?

What is the point of changing the who of how we were born and the what of who we hope to be — even if only for an impermanent moment?

7 Comments

  1. I think people change their physical bodies because they want to show that they can. It’s like people who get artificial horns. Look at me, they are saying. I am in control here. I have the reins.

  2. I rather like the sun tattoo – decorative and almost tribal/cultural and temporary rather than permanent ink.
    A lot of the people I know who have tattoos have got them done for a dare, or were very drunk at the time.
    It is almost a right of passage.
    My son has several very primeval looking symbols across his shoulders and one across his lower back – as well as several piercings.
    My youngest daughter has a rather beautiful butterfly on her hip – her 16th Birthday present to herself.
    My sons are loud and proud and defiant. My daughters is pretty and discrete.
    My sons are very non-conformist for tattoos – and my daughters is purely decorative.
    Very different tattoos for very different reasons.
    In my lifestyle they are often used to denote permanent ownership.
    Ink is NOT my thing – I do admire some of the Henna temporary tattoos and I am fascinated by the sun work you have shown today.

  3. I appreciate your insight, Nicola! Can you describe an “ownership” tattoo? Is there a general standard? Or are they all unique in their claim?
    I do love the Indian henna designs on the hands for celebrations — incredibly beautiful and fantastic!

  4. The ownership tattoos are usually individual in design but incorporating BDSM symbols – chains, rope knot work or a curled whip along with initials and a date.
    I will see if I can find some examples.

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