Here’s an eyeful of words for you to wonder on today:  “Talent to know the talent has the talent to develop the talent.”  My explanation and exploration follows.

Talent is a skill that was gifted at birth.  Talent cannot be given or invented — it can only be developed and then shared.  Everyone has a talent for the tapping.

Talent on its own will stagnate.  Talent requires exposure to other talent for comparison, stretching, tearing and moderation of the promise.

Recognizing raw talent is a talent.  The ability to sense a lurking talent is like seeing a light that can only be found in the night sky.  During the dawn, that spark blends in with the rest of the white light noise of the day.

When talent is found, the hard work begins.  The talent must be taught and respected and condoned, but never coddled or calcified.  Talent bends.  Sometimes it breaks.  Talent is never brittle.

One of the great sadnesses of the modern life is when raw talent doesn’t go undeveloped, but rather suffocates, unnoticed.  The talent is half-formed.  The spark of life is never ignited.  The being never becomes the whole.  The inchoate person wanders throughout the landscape of the living like a spectre searching for a sighting.

It takes talent to recognize talent and we must act on that inspirational understanding — even if the raw talent is unaware, or unwilling, to live up to the promise of their life.

Talent is intimately rounded and shared.  Talent requires a direct approach.  Talent is unable to be construed from afar.  Local intervention is needed.

Once talent matures, new energy is brought into the world to illuminate bold realms of the human spectrum.  Accorded talent exemplifies, exonerates, defines and demonstrates.

When talent is active, it becomes the force of life for others, and that talent will live beyond the body of one and embed universal dreams and human yearnings deep into the horizon of the rest of us to illuminate the way for future generations.

Talent to know the talent has the talent to develop the talent.

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